Wednesday, December 30, 2009

The crazy rhythm of Take Five

Last night Dave Brubeck was recognized at the Kennedy Center Awards. As I watched, and listened, it all came back to me.

I played piano, competitively, as a child. I took to the piano like, oh, I don’t know. Peanut butter to jelly? I loved it. I was a classically trained pianist and could play baroque to classical to romantic to modern. I was in my element when I played. But I was never a play-by-ear musician. Meaning, if I heard a tune, I couldn't just sit down and play it. I needed music. But I could play just about anything you put in front of me. Musicians who entertain at parties? I envy them and their ability to tickle the ivories and take on requests. I played parties too, but always with my stack of music, and requests only if I had the sheet music. (Even Culture Club had sheet music for piano and yes, I played "I'll Tumble For You" on the piano. Wrong in so many ways but that's another story.)

Playing by ear was a bit out of my comfort zone. So sometimes I studied with a jazz musician. This was a whole new kind of playing. Feeling and offbeat and putting pieces together. It was like being right handed and trying to write with your left hand. It made me uncomfortable because it was so different and outside of my knowledge. So I studied jazz sheet music, and the first one I could remember was Take Five. Every time I attempted to play it, my dad cooed “ooooh I love that one.” So I worked a little harder at it. It had a rhythm like nothing else I had played. It wasn’t wild and outside of the musical parameters I knew: I could see there was a logic to it. A complex logic with an upbeat in the opposite place I would expect and a constant chattering of my left hand to keep the beat driving right on schedule.


Take Five was a huge hit in the late 1950’s and early 60’s. Performed by The Dave Brubeck Quartet it featured a saxophone melody, thus explaining my dad’s particular fondness for it. But it was that quirky 5/4 or quintuple time meter that had intrigued and challenged me so much.

As a child, I hadn’t realized how influential the song was. I just knew it was tough and fun to play, and finally, it was a jazz song I could not only pull off, thanks to practicing it and some special coaching, but one my dad loved to hear too. Playing piano wasn’t a solitary effort: it was one in which I received praise and recognition for, and from my dad that was a golden moment.

I’m pretty sure I still have the sheet music for Take Five. I wonder if I can still play it. I practiced it so many times, over and over and over, that crazy rhythm is drilled into my brain.

In honor of Mr. Brubeck’s award last night, I just may play a little Take Five today. On the same piano I played it on as a girl. Dad might even get a phone call. There’s no guarantee I can get my right hand to turn out that melody, but I know I can get that crazy quintuple time going with my left.

11 comments:

Roey said...

What a great story! I also studied classical music, but loved playing jazz and really miss that part of my life. It's such a time of reflection, right before the new year--thanks for taking me back there. I'd love to hear you play piano sometime.

Kari said...

I hope you do try and play it...and call your Dad! In fact, video tape it and YouTube it so we can all hear it! Good luck! How awesome that you can play the piano. Happy New Year Lelo!

A Lewis said...

I'd love to hear you play sometime. Maybe you and my hubby could do a dueling pianos sort of concert tour! Happy New Year!

Anonymous said...

I Love me some Brubeck!

And if you haven't tried it yet, get yourself the "sheet music" to the Peanuts Christmas Trio by Vince Guaraldi. the rhythms are challenging and - like the Brubeck - VERY unlike those Bach Two-Part Inventions you may have slaved away at....

You'll love it!

Enjoya - and Happy New Years!

Susan in GA

Heather said...

I love Take Five. And I am impressed you mastered it on piano. I suck at anything other than classical, reading the music. I'm finally after all these years learning to play hymns!

dennis said...

You are "right on" about your music skills. Thanks for all the wonderful hours of family music you provided on the piano. And now you have that piano!!!
Love,
Dad

Penelope said...

Loved this post, Lelo--made me think of our dual piano sessions. What was that piece of music you had? Piano dancer?

jelly said...

very cool!

Marilyn said...

"Take Five" was definitely part of the soundtrack of my childhood...my parents seemed to play that album a lot. it was probably the first jazz song i took a liking to. i *loved* the video they showed of Brubeck and how he came up with the rhythm for the song, combining the two passions of his early life.

Anonymous said...

I learned how to play "Take Five" back in the 60's. When I listen to it now, it still just enthralls me. Such a classic. You have very good taste.

Anonymous said...

I loved watching the Brubeck part of the Kennedy Honors this year. I love that he started learning jazz rhythms by imposing rhythms over the rhythm of a horse galloping, and that he got the Take 5 rhythm from sounds he heard on the street while traveling. This was a great post.